Displaying all posts for Tarasque

Tarasque Spotted in Wild

by December 15, 2011 » Add the second comment.
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Chorus member Terry Winslow e-mailed this photograph of a tarasque to the chorus this week: Here’s proof that the tarasque is a real live piece of Provence’s folk history: a carving on a column at the church of Saint-Trophime in Arles. If I understand the construction history correctly, the oldest Read more »

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Goodbye to Andalusia

by December 13, 2011 » Add more comments.
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Well, it’s over. Our beautiful Andalusian world has been dismantled. The final step in The Christmas Revels is taking down the set and moving all of our things out of the theater that we’d occupied for the last two weeks. The entire cast helps out with strike. The actual set Read more »

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A Little Bit of Help on the Program

by November 30, 2011 » Add more comments.
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I’ve spent a lot of time in the last few days helping to finish the Christmas Revels program. Our program is really elaborate. It has about eight articles, some about Revels activities and some about aspects of this year’s show. There’s a section of program notes that list every song, Read more »

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The Terrible, Adorable Tarasque

by November 23, 2011 » Add the second comment.
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Usually our Mummers play–the play-within-a-play in the second part of The Christmas Revels–features a hero fighting some kind of terrible monster. St. George and the dragon, for example. This year instead of a dragon we have a tarasque. The tarasque is a fearsome beast that ravaged, so the story goes, Read more »

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Happy Halloween

by November 2, 2011 » Add more comments.
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Every year, Reveler Barry Galef brings us a special treat: One of his carved pumpkins. These aren’t the jack-o-lanterns you’re used to, with the triangles for eyes and the half-moon for a mouth. He treats the pumpkin as a work of art, carving a detailed scene into their orange skin. Read more »

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